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  • Developmental English Vocabulary List

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Academic English: The form of English writing that is used by scholars (that is you!) to communicate with one another.  This is the form of English that is expected in most all college-level writing, including this course. Academic English does not use contractions or slang, and is different from everyday spoken English in several other important ways. Just "using fancy words" does not make a text into academic English--the best academic English is often the plainest, simplest and most fat-free writing.

Wiki Markup+Audience+: The people for whom you are writing, or who will be reading what you write. Writing works only when it meets the needs of a specific audience. One of the first tasks of the writer is to decide who the audience is, and what makes them different from other groups, and then target the text specifically to the audience. Writing that is done for "everyone," "the whole world," or "anyone who reads it" \[the imaginary "universal audience"\] is writing for no audience. Unless you are writing Holy Scripture, never write for works only when it meets the needs of a specific audience. One of the first tasks of the writer is to decide who the audience is, and what makes them different from other groups, and then target the text specifically to the audience. Writing that is done for "everyone," "the whole world," or "anyone who reads it" [the imaginary "universal audience"] is writing for no audience. Unless you are writing Holy Scripture, never write for "everyone."

Body paragraphs: In a text, everything but the Introduction and Conclusion.

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Topic sentence: A sentence determining the topic of a paragraph. A topic sentence is to a paragraph what a thesis statement is to an essay or other text. Topic sentence branch from the thesis statement of the whole text like branches on a tree.  

Verb "to be": Is, was, were, will be, etc. Prefer other, more interesting verbs in your writing.

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